Silk Chiffon and The LuLuwrap

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"Silk does for the body what diamonds do for the hand."

Oscar de la Renta

 

People have asked me why I chose silk chiffon as the fabric for the LuLuwrap. For me, silk is the ultimate luxurious fabric, so light and transparent, that every flowing movement is like a dance. Silk chiffon conjures up images of a ballerina in grand jete across the stage, a trapeeze artist flying through the air or a sexy woman slinking her way through a party.

For hundreds of years silk has held the position of the Queen of Textiles."  It is lustrous, strong, and absorbent. It has a shine and radiates color like no other fabric can due to its fiber structure. It is an excellent fabric for creating a beautiful drape. It is one of the most comfortable fabrics that you can wear because it keeps you cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Silk is soft, supple and its flowing nature and shimmery texture has a way of hiding body flaws. Silk is a natural fiber that is hypoallergenic, mildew and wrinkle resistant, biodegradable and doesn't attract dirt.

It has been found that silk can also contribute to your health and well-being. Being a natural fiber it has an especially high electromagnetic charge. This can enhance your spiritual development by amplifying the subtle energies that flow within. Many yogis wear garments of silk, because it is particularly good at tuning into and holding a vibration, and the wearing of silk is like stepping into a sacred space. 

Most silk is obtained from the mulberry silkworm raised in captivity. The unraveled thread is surrounded by a gummy substance called sericin that holds the threads together to make the cocoon. The sericin must be removed by washing the unwound thread, generally in an oil and soap bath. Because the source of silk are rare caterpillars, the quantity of silk available is limited - no more than 2% of the world's fabric is in the form of silk.

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Legend has it that the production of silk fabric from the silkworm's thread was discovered by the Chinese empress Si-Ling-Chi around 2640 B.C. The legend suggests that the thread's properties were discovered when a cocoon fell into a cup of tea. When removed, the cocoon partially unravelled, revealing the presence of a continuous and strong thread. Whether true or not, silk fabric became one of the main explorts of China over centuries, and the means of production was kept a closely guarded secret. 

Linda MasonComment