Sisterhood

Screen Shot 2018-01-30 at 8.36.29 PM.png

Over the past few years I’ve seen my circle of friends change. Some have moved away, others have had children, or their jobs are taking up all their time. I realized that it was no longer “Let’s meet for lunch and go shopping” on the spur of the moment. Every thing had to be planned in advance, and so we saw each other less.

Then when I started my company, LuLuBdesign, all of my time was committed to making my business grow. I found myself working alone most every day, unless I had to go to a business meeting or search out fabrics and buttons, otherwise it was just my computer and me. Now Siri is cool but she cannot replace connecting with a friend over a glass of pinot noir. In-person connections create bonds and heartfelt discussion which allows us to be more vulnerable with each other and that is the foundation for deep relationships.

The void in my life was no longer tenable I really missed the company of my women friends and decided to check out a few meet up and mastermind groups. I wanted to meet new, like-minded women and make friends who are empowered and entrepreneurial. I became part of a group of women who get together once a month for a Sister Supper where we exchange ideas, inspire each other, ask for help if needed or just want to be witnessed and of course engage in lots of laughs. Within no time I saw how we genuinely care for each other and wish each other well.

I have come to understand the importance of sisterhood and community. To be a sister is to be a friend, to be loyal. It is to give a smile and lend a hand. It is being a fierce advocate and builder of other women. Being a sister means you value other women as you value yourself. Through sisterhood you can learn to love yourself, to feel worthy and valued. The positive effects of connecting with others is as essential to having a happy, productive life as is our need for air, water and food.

 

 

 

 

Linda MasonComment